YOGA

When unconscious became conscious this is Samadhi

The World Mother is coming into physical manifestation August 31, 2014


Johanna Brandt. 1936,  The Paraclete Or Coming World Mother

“the World Mother is coming into physical manifestation at this critical time to expound the teachings of the Christ, 

 I believe that the Revelation of our Mother-God is only the beginning of the Cosmic Surprises awaiting us in the Age of
Woman

 We cannot have a Father in Heaven without a Mother.

When the Comforter comes in the outstanding form of a Woman to teach us the truth about the Motherhood of God the teachings of the Christ will be better understood and more universally acceptable

 In ” The Perfect Way ” by Dr. Anna Kingsford, in Lecture Nine, page 293, paragraph 43, the writer mentions the Holy Ghost, the Third Person, the Aspect of God as the Mother, “having been ignored or suppressed by a priesthood desirous of preserving a purely Masculine Conception of the Godhead. ”

Her influence will never be withdrawn, for She will abide with us forever, as Her Son said when He was preparing to leave the world after His brief  ministry. This is a great Promise, and if I have understood aright, the Comforter will be with us for many years in the flesh

WHO IS THIS WOMAN? Of all the women in the world, WHO HAS BEEN CHOSEN BY THE SUPREME TO FULFIL THE ROLE OF THE COMFORTER OF THE WORLD WHEN IT ENTERS THE COSMIC CRUCIBLE?

 

The World Mother will be the first human being to do the “greater works” prophesied by Jesus the Christ, and She will not only do them but also teach us how to do them in the ordinary course of the daily life.”

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Our Mother the Ruach HaKodesh March 4, 2010


The Sabbath Bride
Part 2: The Ministry of the Ruach HaKodesh
By James Trimm

The sad truth is that many do not understand the Ruach HaKodesh, and even fewer understand the ministry of the Ruach HaKodesh, a ministry which is absolutely key to the Assembly of Elohim.

Our Mother the Ruach HaKodesh

We were created in the image of Elohim (Gen. 1:26-27; 1Cor. 11:7). This Image of Elohim is an invisible image of attributes, which make up the godhead (Col. 1:15; Rom. 1:27).

“What may be known of Elohim is manifest in them [mankind] his invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead…”
(Rom. 1:19)

Then in Rom. 1:26-28 we are told that those who fail to perceive these things may fall into the errors of Homosexuality and Lesbianism. So when in creation were Elohim’s invisible attributes manifested in man and made clearly seen. The answer is in the Torah, in Gen. 1:26, 27 where we read:

Then Elohim said, “Let Us make man in Our image,
according to Our likeness…
So Elohim created man in His own image;
in the image of Elohim He created him;
male and female He created them.

Now following the parallelism of the passage, “Our image”, “Our likeness” and “male and female” appear to be parallel terms.

These feminine and masculine attributes are represented in the Tanak by the Father (Jer. 31:9; Mal. 1:9; Is. 63:16; 64:8), the Mother (Is. 66:13 ) and the Son (Prov. 30:4; Ps. 2:2, 7, 12).

The female aspect of the three pillars of the Godhead is called “mother”. This is YHWH expressed to man, not in his aspect of “Father” but in the aspect of “Mother”. as we also read in the Tanak:

As one whom his mother comforts, so will I [YHWH] comfort you…
(Is. 66:13)

YHWH as a “comforter” is also known as the Ruach HaKodesh (Holy Spirit) as we read in Yochanan:

…I will ask my Father and he will give you another Comforter that will be with you forever,
The Spirit of Truth …

(Jn. 14:16-17)

…the comforter, the Ruach HaKodesh, whom my Father will send in my name,…
(Jn. 14:27)

…when the Comforter comes. Whom I will send you from my Father, the Spirit of Truth who has proceeded from my Father…
(Jn. 15:26)

…I will send the comforter to you.
(Jn. 16:7)

The Ruach HaKodesh is the Spirit of Elohim, which rested upon Messiah at his immersion:

…behold, the Spirit of Elohim descending from the heavens…and rested upon him…
(Mt. 3:16-17=Mk. 1:10-11 = Lk. 3:21-22 = Jn. 1:33)

Which is the Spirit of YHWH which rests upon Messiah in Isaiah 11:2-4:

And the Spirit of YHWH shall rest upon him, the Spirit of Wisdom (Chokmah) and Understanding (Binah) the Spirit of Counsel (Atzah) and power (Gevurah) the spirit of knowledge and of the fear (yirah) of YHWH …But with righteousness shall he judge…
(Is. 11:2-4)

This Ruach HaKodesh is clearly the “her/she” of Prov. 8:1-2, 12-18:

Does not wisdom call, And understanding put forth her voice?
Where the paths meet, she stands…I Wisdom (Chokmah) dwell with prudence…the fear (yirah) of YHWH is to hate evil…
Counsel (atzah) is mine…I am understanding (Binah) power (Geburah) is mine…. …by me rule… all judges…


 

Holy Spirit, Holy Ghost, Paraclete, Advocate, Comforter July 17, 2008


The Old Testament
In the OT the spirit of the Lord (ruah yhwh; LXX, to pneuma kyriou)
is generally an expression for God’s power, the extension of himself
whereby he carries out many of his mighty deeds (e.g., 1 Kings 8:12;
Judg. 14:6ff; 1 Sam. 11:6). As such, “spirit” sometimes finds
expression in ways similar to other modes of God’s activity, such
as “the hand of God” (Ps. 19:1; 102:25); “the word of God” (Ps. 33:6;
147:15, 18); and the “wisdom of God” (Exod. 28:3; 1 Kings 3:28; Job
32:8). The origins of the word “spirit” in both Hebrew (ruah) and
Greek (pneuma) are similar, stemming from associations with “breath”
and “wind,” which were connected by ancient cultures to unseen
spiritual force, hence “spirit” (cf. John 3:8, note the association
with air in English; e.g., “pneumatic,” “respiration, ” etc.). The AV
uses the term “Holy Ghost” for “Holy Spirit” based on an obsolete
usage of the word “ghost” (from Middle English and Anglo-Saxon,
originally meaning “breath,” “spirit”, cf. the German Geist). Thus it
is understandable that God’s creative word (Gen. 1:3ff.) is closely
akin to God’s creative breath (Gen. 2:7). Both ideas are identified
elsewhere with God’s spirit. As an agent in creation, God’s spirit is
the life principle of both men and animals (Job 33:4; Gen. 6:17;
7:15).

The primary function of the spirit of God in the OT is as the spirit
of prophecy. God’s spirit is the motivating force in the inspiration
of the prophets, that power which moved sometimes to ecstasy but
always to the revelation of God’s message, expressed by the prophets
with “thus saith the Lord.” Prophets are sometimes referred to
as “men of God” (1 Sam. 2:27; 1 Kings 12:22; etc.); in Hos. 9:7 they
are “men of the Spirit.” The general implication in the OT is that
the prophets were inspired by the spirit of God (Num. 11:17; 1 Sam.
16:15; Mic. 3:8; Ezek. 2:2; etc.).

The phrase “Holy Spirit” appears in two contexts in the OT, but is
qualified both times as God’s holy Spirit (Ps. 51:11; Isa. 63:10-11,
14), such that it is clear that God himself is the referent, not the
Holy Spirit which is encountered in the NT. The OT does not contain
an idea of a semi-independent divine entity, the Holy Spirit. Rather,
we find special expressions of God’s activity with and through men.
God’s spirit is holy in the same way his word and his name are holy;
they are all forms of his revelation and, as such, are set in
antithesis to all things human or material. The OT, especially the
prophets, anticipates a time when God, who is holy (or “other
than/separate from” men; cf. Hos. 11:9) will pour out his spirit on
men (Joel 2:28ff.; Isa. 11:1ff.; Ezek. 36:14ff.). who will themselves
become holy. The Messiah/ Servant of God will be the one upon whom
the spirit rests (Isa. 11:1ff.; 42:1ff.; 63:1ff.), and will
inaugurate the time of salvation (Ezek. 36:14ff.; cf. Jer. 31:31ff.).

Intertestamental Judaism
Within intertestamental Judaism several significant developments
shaped the idea of “Holy Spirit” as it was understood in NT times.
After the OT prophets had proclaimed the coming of the Spirit in the
messianic age of salvation, Judaism had developed the idea that the
spirit of prophecy had ceased within Israel with the last of the
biblical prophets (Syriac Bar. 85:3; 1 Macc. 4:46; 14:41; etc.; cf.
Ps. 74:9). Consequently, there arose from time to time a hope of the
dawning of the new age, especially within the apocalyptic movement,
which generally pointed to a supposed messiah and/or prophetic
reawakening of some kind (cf. Acts 5:34ff.). The Qumran community is
illustrative of this, since it understood itself to be involved in
the fulfillment of Israel’s messianic hope as the “preparers of the
way of the Lord” (Isa. 40:3; cf. 1QS 8. 14-16). The Qumran literature
also shows increased identification of the spirit of prophecy
with “God’s Holy Spirit” (1QS 8. 16; Zadokite Documents II. 12). The
phrase, “the Holy Spirit,” occasionally occurs in Judaism (IV Ezra
14:22; Ascension of Isa. 5:14; etc.), but, as in the rabbis, it
generally meant “God’s spirit of prophecy.” Thus, the messaianic
expectation of Judaism, which included the eschatological outpouring
of God’s spirit (e.g., 1 Enoch 49:3, citing Isa. 11:2; cf. Sybilline
Oracle III, 582, based on Joel 2:28ff.), was bound up with the
conviction that the Spirit had ceased in Israel with the last of the
prophets; the Holy Spirit was understood as God’s spirit of prophecy,
which would be given again in the new age to a purified Israel in
conjunction with the advent of a messiah.

The concept of the Holy Spirit was broadened through the Wisdom
Literature, especially in the personification of wisdom as that idea
came into contact with the idea of Spirit. As early as Prov. 8:22ff.
and Job 28:25ff. wisdom is presented as a more or less independent
aspect of God’s power (here as agent in creation), and wisdom is
credited with functions and characteristics that are attributed to
the Holy Spirit in the NT. Wisdom proceeded from the mouth of God and
covered the earth as a mist at creation (Sir. 24:3); she is the
breath of the power of God (Wisd. Solomon 7:25); and by means of his
wisdom God formed man (Wisd. Sol. 9:2). The Lord poured out wisdom
upon all his works, and she dwells with all flesh (Sir. 1:9-10).
Moreover, wisdom is full of spirit, and indeed is identified with the
Spirit (Wisd. Sol. 7:22; 9:1; cf. 1:5). Thus the Jews of NT times
were familiar with the background of these ideas as they are
variously expressed in the NT, ideas which use these background
concepts but move beyond them to some unexpected conclusions. Indeed,
Jesus taught that his messiahship and the corresponding outpouring of
the Spirit were firmly rooted in OT understanding (Luke 4:18ff.,
citing Isa. 61:1-2), and, similar to intertestamental Judaism,
understood the messianic Spirit of the Lord to be the Holy Spirit
(Matt. 12:32), the spirit which had foretold through the prophets
that the coming Messiah would inaugurate the age of salvation with
the pouring out of the Spirit on all flesh….

Advocate, (Gr. parakletos), one who pleads another’s cause, who helps
another by defending or comforting him. It is a name given by Christ
three times to the Holy Ghost (John 14:16; 15:26; 16:7, where the
Greek word is rendered “Comforter,” q.v.).

Comforter, the designation of the Holy Ghost (John 14:16, 26; 15:26;
16:7; R.V. marg., “or Advocate, or Helper; Gr. paracletos”) . The same
Greek word thus rendered is translated “Advocate” in 1 John 2:1 as
applicable to (the Comforter to be sent by) Christ. It means
properly “one who is summoned to the side of another” to help him in
a court of justice by defending him, “one who is summoned to plead a
cause.”

Spirit, Breath
Ruah: “breath; air; strength; wind; breeze; spirit; courage; temper;
Spirit.” This noun has cognates in Ugaritic, Aramaic, and Arabic. The
word occurs about 378 times and in all periods of biblical Hebrew…

Ruah frequently represents the element of life in a man, his
natural “spirit”: “And all flesh died that moved upon the earth,…
All in whose nostrils was the breath of life …” (Gen. 7:21-22). In
these verses the animals have a “spirit” (cf. Ps. 104:29). On the
other hand, in Prov. 16:2 the word appears to mean more than just the
element of life; it seems to mean “soul”: “All the ways of a man are
clean in his own eyes; but the Lord weigheth the spirits
[NASB, “motives”].” Thus, Isaiah can put nepes, “soul,” and ruah in
synonymous parallelism: “With my soul have I desired thee in the
night; yea, with my spirit within me will I seek thee early …”
(26:9). It is the “spirit” of a man that returns to God (Eccl. 12:7).

… the Bible often speaks of God’s “Spirit,” the third person of the
Trinity. This is the use of the word in its first biblical
occurrence: “And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness
was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the
face of the waters” (Gen. 1:2). Isa. 63:10-11 and Ps. 51:12
specifically speak of the “holy or free Spirit.” “

Holy Spirit, Holy Ghost, Paraclete, Advocate, Comforter
http://www.mb-soft. com/believe/ text/holyspir. htm

“If we follow Him (Jesus) then we cannot be conditioned by anything
because He talked of Spirit only. Spirit cannot be conditioned,
conditioned by anything. . . . I am here to tell you all these things
which Christ could not tell, and to fulfil what He wanted to say. All
those things I am saying to you.”

Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi
Christmas Puja, Delhi, India — December 24, 1995

“The Kundalini rises through a very thin line of Brahmanadi. In the
beginning only a hair like thing rises, it pierces through; in some
people ,of course, in a big way it rises also. And then it pierces
this fontanel bone area which is a real baptism, real. Today only
people felt the cool breeze coming out of their heads. Can you do
that by jumping, or by paying money? They felt the cool breeze in the
hand. It’s written in the Bible, even in the Bible very clearly, that
it’s the cool breeze, cool breeze is the sign of the Holy Ghost. You
start feeling the cool breeze in your hands and you start feeling the
cool breeze on your head. This is the actualization.

Of course, you people don’t read other books which are very good,
like Adi Shankaracharya, People don’t even like the mention of his
name who has really and clearly said that it is the cool breeze; the
chaitanya is to be felt like cool breeze in the hands. They do not
want that you should know the truth. And this is the truth that when
you get your realization, you have to feel the cool breeze in your
hands yourself. You have to judge yourself. I’m not going to tell
you. It is you who has to see, it is you who has to feel, and then
you have to grow and you have to know all and everything; all the
secrets of Divine Science. You become the master then, you are the
guru.

You are the Spirit, and you should get it. It’s your own which is
given to you. I have nothing to do about it. I’m just a catalyst.”

Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi
Maccabean Hall
, Australia on March 22, 1981

 

The Holy Spirit: The Feminine Aspect Of the Godhead July 10, 2008


The Holy Spirit:
The Feminine Aspect Of the Godhead

J. J. Hurtak, PhD, The Academy For Future Science

“There is currently much talk of “feminine issues,” particularly in
social and political contexts. This growing awareness of gender-
related matters was not something ignored by the early Church and the
writers of ancient religious texts. As we see in this article by Dr.
Hurtak, the notion of femininity played an extremely important and
significant role in the thinking and belief system of the
intertestamental authors. Far from being the overbearing patriarchal
advocates as they are often portrayed, more recent findings reveal an
innate sensitivity and appreciation for the feminine aspect of
Divinity than has been previously suspected. For this reason, this
particular article becomes a meaningful and insightful contribution
to the current discussion of the role of the female in modern times.
Once more we find a rich and profound history reshaping the future
even as it unfolds before our eyes.

A new response to the “image” of the Holy Spirit is taking shape
quietly in scholarly circles throughout the world, as the result of
new findings in the Dead Sea Scriptures, the Coptic Nag Hammadi and
intertestamental texts of Jewish mystics found side-by-side the
writings of the early Christian church. Scholars are recognizing the
Holy Spirit as the “female vehicle” for the outpouring of higher
teaching and spiritual rebirth. The Holy Spirit plays varied roles in
Judeo-Christian traditions: acting in Creation, imparting wisdom, and
inspiring Old Testament prophets. In the New Testament She is the
presence of God in the world and a power in the birth and life of
Jesus.

The Holy Spirit became well-established as part of a circumincession,
a partner in the Trinity with the Father and Son after doctrinal
controversies of the late 4th century AD solidified the position of
the Western Church. Although all Christian Churches accept the union
of three persons in one Godhead, the Eastern Church, particularly the
communities of the Greek, Ethiopian, Armenian, and Russian, do not
solidify a strong union of personalities, but see the figures
uniquely differentiated, but still in union. Moreover, the Eastern
Church places the Holy Spirit as the Second Person of the Trinity
with Christ as the Third, whereas the Western Church places the Son
before the Holy Spirit. In the Old Testament and the Dead Sea Scrolls
the Holy Spirit was known as the Ruach or Ruach Ha Kodesh (Psalm
51:11). In the New Testament as Pneuma (Romans 8:9). The Holy Spirit
was not rendered as “Holy Ghost” until the appearance of the 1611
Protestant King James Version of the Bible. For the most part, Ruach
or Pneuma have been considered the spiritual force or presence of
God. The power of this force can be seen in the Christian church as
the “gifts of the Spirit” (especially in today’s tongues-speaking
Pentecostals) . The Holy Spirit was also a source for Divine guidance
and as the indwelling Comforter.

Likewise in Hebrew thought, Ruach Ha Kodesh was considered a voice
sent from on high to speak to the Prophet. Thus, in the Old Testament
language of the prophets, She is the Divine Spirit of indwelling
sanctification and creativity and is considered as having a feminine
power. “He” as a reference to Spirit has been used in theology to
match the pronoun for God, yet the Hebrew word ruach is a noun of
feminine gender. Thus, referring to the Holy Spirit as “she” has some
linguistic justification. Denoting Spirit as a feminine principle,
the creative principle of life, makes sense when considering the
Trinity aspect where Father plus Spirit leads to the Divine Extension
of Divine Sonship.

The Spirit is not called “it” despite the fact that pneuma in Greek
is a neuter noun. Church doctrine regards the Holy Spirit as a
person, not a force like magnetism. The writings of the Catholic
fathers, in fact, preserve the vision of the Spirit encapsulating
the “peoplehood of Christ” as the Bride or as the “Mother Church.”
Both are feminine aspects of the Divine. In the Eastern Church,
Spirit was always considered to have a feminine nature. She was the
life-bearer of the faith. Clement of Alexandria states that “she” is
an indwelling Bride. Amongst the Eastern Church communities there is
none more clear about the feminine aspect of the Holy Spirit as the
corpus of the Coptic-Gnostics. One such document records that Jesus
says, “Even so did my mother, the Holy Spirit, take me by one of my
hairs and carry me away to the great mountain Tabor [in Galilee].”

The 3rd century scroll of mystical Coptic Christianity, The Acts of
Thomas, gives a graphic account of the Apostle Thomas’ travels to
India, and contains prayers invoking the Holy Spirit as “the Mother
of all creation” and “compassionate mother,” among other titles. The
most profound Coptic Christian writings definitely link the “spirit
of Spirit” manifested by Christ to all believers as the “Spirit of
the Divine Mother.” Most significant are the new manuscript
discoveries of recent decades which have demonstrated that more early
Christians than previously thought regarded the Holy Spirit as the
Mother of Jesus.

One text is the Gospel of Thomas which is part of the newly
discovered Nag Hammadi texts (discovered 1945-1947). Most are
composed about the same time as the Biblical gospels in the 1st and
2nd century AD. In this gospel, Jesus declares that his disciples
must hate their earthly parents (as in Luke 14:26) but love the
Father and Mother as he does, “for my mother (gave me falsehood), but
(my) true Mother gave me life.” In another Nag Hammadi discovery, The
Secret Book of James, Jesus refers to himself as “the son of the Holy
Spirit.” These two sayings do not identify the Holy Spirit as the
mothering vehicle of Jesus, but more than one scholar has interpreted
them to mean that the maternal Holy Spirit is intended.

So far in Western traditional theology, the voices advocating a
feminine Holy Spirit are scattered and subtle. But for them, it is a
view theologically defensible and accompanied by psychological,
sociological, and scientific benefits of recognizing “the new
supernature” developing within vast consciousness changes happening
in the human evolution.

The German theologian Jürgen Moltmann, a well-known thinker in
mainline Protestantism, says “monotheism is monarchism.” He says a
traditional idea of God’s absolute power “generally provides the
justification for earthly domination”- – -from the emperors and
despots of history to 20th century dictators. Moltmann argues for a
new appreciation of the “persons” of the Trinity and the community or
family model it presents for human relations.

According to Professor Neil Q. Hamilton at Drew University School of
Theology, the Gospel of John shows us how “the Holy Spirit begins to
perform a mothering role for us that is unconditional acceptance,
love and caring.” God then begins to parent us in father and mother
modes.

A Catholic scholar, Franz Mayr, a philosophy professor at the
University of Portland, also favors the recognition of the Holy
Spirit as feminine. He contends that the traditional unity of God
would not have to be watered down in order for scholars to accept the
feminine side of God . Mayr, who studied under the renown German
theologian Karl Rahner, said he came to his view during his study of
the writings of St. Augustine (AD 354-430) who saw that a significant
number of early Christians must have accepted a feminine aspect of
the Holy Spirit such that the influential church father of North
Africa castigated this view. St. Augustine claimed that the
acceptance of the Holy Spirit as the “mother of the Son of God and
wife-consort of the Father” was merely a pagan outlook. But Mayr
contends that Augustine “skipped over the social and maternal aspect
of God,” which Mayr thinks is best seen in the Holy Spirit, the
Divine Ruach Ha Kodesh. St. Jerome, a contemporary of Augustine’s,
and two church fathers of an earlier period, Clement of Alexandria
and Origen, quoted from the pseudopigraphic Gospel of the Hebrews,
which depicted the Holy Spirit as a “mother figure.”

A 14th Century fresco in a small Catholic Church southeast of Munich,
Germany depicts a female Spirit as part of the Holy Trinity,
according to Leonard Swidler of Temple University. The woman and two
bearded figures flanking her appear to be wrapped in a single cloak
and joined in their lower halves showing a union of old and new
bodies of birth and rebirth.

In conclusion, we are living at a time of profound and revelatory
discoveries of archaeology and ancient spiritual texts that point the
way to the future. Christ, himself, was said to have female disciples
as disclosed in Gnostic literature and recent archeological findings
of early Christian tombs in Italy. A beginning has been made to
reclaim “the Spirit” of the Ruach found in the mountain of newly
discovered pre-Christian texts and Coptic-Egyptian texts of the early
Church . It is becoming clear in re-examining the first 100 years of
Christianity that an earlier Christianity was closer to the “Feminine
Spirit” of the Old Testament, the Ruach or the beloved Shekinah. The
Shekinah, distinct from the Ruach, was seen as the indwelling Divine
Presence that activated the “birth of miracles” or the anointed self.
Accordingly, the growth of traditional Christianity made alternative
adjustments of the original position of the “birth of gifts” as
Christendom compromised for the privilege of becoming an
establishment.

The new directions of spiritual and scientific studies are showing
that it is now possible that the Holy Spirit, Ruach Ha Kodesh, can be
portrayed as feminine as the indwelling presence of God, the
Shekinah, nurturing and bringing to birth souls for the kingdom.
Spiritual insights recorded in the Book of Knowledge: Keys of Enoch
carefully remind us that we are being prepared to understand that
just as the Old Testament was the Age of the Father, the New
Testament the Age of the Son, so this coming Age where gifts are
poured forth will be the Age of the Holy Spirit.”

J. J. Hurtak, PhD, The Academy For Future Science

 

The Christian Goddess July 1, 2008


“Many theologians and scholars believe the Holy Spirit written as,
Pneuma in Greek every time it appears in the New Testament, is a
feminine being. Note that Pneuma is a neuter word in Greek, but in
Hebrew the word Ruah (Spirit) and in Aramaic the word Shekinah
(Presence) are feminine words and imply a feminine divine presence.
The Holy Spirit is possibly a Christian Goddess, not a mysterious
invisible member of an all-male Trinity “club.” Or more
provocatively, maybe there is a Feminine Trinity of God-the-Mother
(Sophia and Mary?), God-the-Daughter (Mary Magdalene) and Goddess-the-
Spirit-Presence (Shekinah, Ruah). The Holy Spirit appears at Yeshua’s
baptism in the form of a dove. The dove has long been a symbol of the
Goddess in the Ancient Near East, and was never used to symbolize any
male Being or God.

We must also look in the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, and
consider the Goddess Sophia. Her name means “Wisdom.” She is the
Goddess of Wisdom referred to repeatedly in scripture as the wife of
God-the-Father. See Proverbs, Song of Songs, (also called Song of
Solomon) in the Hebrew Bible, and see the Book of Sirach and the Book
of Wisdom in the Apocrypha found in the center of any Catholic Bible.

Here is an excerpt from “The Decline of the Feminine and the Cult of
Mary In Greco-Roman Christianity” , probably because of the dangers of
Gnosticism, the biblical images of God as female were soon suppressed
within the doctrine of God. God as Wisdom, Hokmah in Hebrew, or
Sophia in Greek, a feminine form, was translated by Christianity into
the Logos concept of Philo, which is masculine and was defined as the
Son of God. The Shekinah, the theology of God’s mediating presence as
female, was de-emphasized; and God’s Spirit Ruah, a feminine noun in
Hebrew, took on a neuter form when translated into Greek as Pneuma.

The Vulgate translated Ruah into Latin as masculine, Spiritus. God’s
Spirit, Ruah, which at the beginning of creation brings forth
abundant life in the waters, makes the womb of Mary fruitful. In
spite of the reality of the caring, consoling, healing aspects of
divine activity, the dominant patriarchal tradition has prevailed,
resulting in seeing the female as the passive recipient of God’s
creation; and the female is expressed in nature, church, soul, and
finally Mary as the prototype of redeemed humanity. Because God as
father has become an over literalized metaphor, the symbol of God as
mother is eclipsed. The problem lies not in the fact that male
metaphors are used for God, but that they are used exclusively and
literally. Because images of God as female have been suppressed in
official formulations and teaching, they came to be embodied in the
figure of Mary who functioned to reveal the unfailing love of God.”

The Christian Goddess
http://www.northernway.org/goddess. html

 

The Holy Spirit in the Bible is regarded as: June 25, 2008


According to various Jewish/Christians scholars the Holy Spirit in
the Bible is regarded as:

1. Some mysterious, creative power of God, possessing and inspiring
humans;

Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of
God dwelleth in you.
1 Corinthians 3:16

Now the Lord is that Spirit: And where the Spirit of the Lord is,
there is liberty.
2 Corinthians 3:17

For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of
God
Rom. 8: 14

Likewise the Spirit also helps our infirmities: For we know not what
we should pray for as we ought:
But the Spirit itself makes intercession for us, with groanings
which cannot be uttered.
And he that searches the heart know, what is the mind of the Spirit,
Because She makes intercessions for the saints, according to the
will of God.
Rom. 8: 26-27

2. The Spirit of God;

And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the
face of the deep.
And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
Genesis 1:2

Then said Mary unto the angel, how shall this be, seeing I know not
a man?
And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost will come
unto thee:
Therefore also that holy thing that shall be born of thee, shall be
called the Son of God.”
Luke 1:34-35

For what man knows the things of man, save the spirit of man which
is in him?
Even so the things of God knows no man, but the Spirit of God.
Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit
which is of God;
That we may know the things that are freely given to us of God.
Which things also we speak, not in the words which man’s wisdom
teaches,
But which the Holy Ghost teaches, comparing spiritual things with
spiritual.
1 Corinthians 2: 13

3. The inner principal in the `new life’ in Christ;

The Spirit of the Lord is upon me because She hath anointed me to
preach the gospel to the poor;
She hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to
the captives,
And recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that
are bruised
Luke 4:18

4. A quasi-physical force in the form of wind;

But knowest not whence it comes and where it goes; thus is every one
that is born of the Spirit.
John 3:8

5. The personal activity of God Himself;

Cast me not away from Thy presence, and take not Thy Holy Spirit
from me.
Psalms 51:11

6. A supreme Spirit in prophecy;

For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man:
But holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Ghost.
2 Peter 1:21

7. The Spirit which baptizes;

For John truly baptized with water;
But ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost, not many days hence.
Acts 1: 5

8. The mode of God’s activity in history;

But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the
Father,
Even the Spirit of Truth, which proceeds from the Father, She shall
testify of Me.
John 15:26

“We might go so far, as to consider the Holy Spirit, God’s feminine
presence in the world. The primary attribute of the feminine
principle is receptivity. Therefore, the Holy Spirit demonstrates
itself through it receptivity to others. I have mentioned before,
the Kabbalist look upon Shekinah, a Hebrew term which means God’s
presence, as the feminine expression of the Divine. Likewise, in the
Genesis story, the Spirit of God is said to be “hovering” over the
void and formless world just before creation. In college, my Old
Testament Professor remarked, “It’s the idea of a hen hovering over
her egg, waiting for it to hatch.” In this sense, the Holy Spirit,
is mother God, who loves and shelters all her children without
condition. ”
http://www.cliftonunitaria n.com/

9. The living energy of a personal God;

But if I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the Kingdom of
God is come unto you.
Mat. 12:28

10. The breath of the Almighty;

By the Word of the Lord were the heavens made; and all the host of
them by the breath of his mouth.
Psalms 33: 6

The Spirit of God hath made me, and the breath of the Almighty has
given me life.
Job 33: 4

Thou sendest forth Thy Spirit, they are created: and Thou renewest
the face of the earth.
Psalms 104: 30

The grass withers, the flowers fade: Because the Spirit of the Lord
blows upon it.
Isaiah 40:7

The other word used most often of the Holy Spirit is the Greek word
pneuma. It is translated as “breath” or “spirit” and means breath,
breeze, wind or spirit.”
http://www.ucgstp.org/

“The term “Spirit” translates the Hebrew word ruah, which, in its
primary sense, means breath, air, wind. Jesus indeed uses the
sensory image of the wind to suggest to Nicodemus the transcendent
newness of him who is personally God’s breath, the divine Spirit.”
J. Cardinal Ratzinger, Catechism of the Catholic Church
(J.C.R., Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1994, p. 182.)

11. The Spirit in supernatural endowments of ethical and spiritual
understanding;

I have heard of thee that the Spirit of the Gods is in thee,
And the Light and understanding and excellent wisdom is found in
thee.
Daniel 51:14

And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the Spirit of Wisdom
and understanding,
The Spirit of counsel and might, the Spirit of Knowledge and of the
fear of the Lord.
Isaiah 11: 2

But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man, to profit
withal.
For to one is given by the Spirit the word of wisdom; To another the
word of knowledge by the same Spirit;
To another faith by the same Spirit; To another the gifts of healing
by the same Spirit;
To another the working of miracles; to another prophecy; To another
discerning of spirits;
To another diverse kinds of tongues; To another the interpretation
of tongues;
But all these worketh that one and selfsame Spirit.
1. Corinthians 11: 7-11

12. The Spirit of wisdom and judgment;

But there is a Spirit in man: And the inspiration of Almighty gives
them understanding.
Great men are not always wise: Neither do the aged understand
judgement
Job 32:8-9

Turn you at My reproof: Behold, I will pour out My Spirit unto you,
I will make known My Words unto you.
Proverbs 1:23

13. The mode of human communion with God;

And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out My Spirit
upon all flesh;
And your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall
dream dreams,
Your young men shall see visions, and also upon the servants and
upon the handmaidens,
In those days will I pour out My Spirit.
Joel 2:28-29

14. The mode of transmitting God’s revelation to humans;

The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord has anointed
me,
To peach good tidings unto the meek; He has sent me to bind up the
broken-hearted,
To proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison
to them that are bound.
Isaiah 61:1

15. The Spirit which liberates;

Now the Lord if that Spirit; and where the Spirit of the Lord is,
there is liberty.
2 Corinthians 3:17

16. The Spirit which brings renewal;

Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to
His mercy He saved us,
By the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost.
Titus 3: 5

17. The Spirit which brings hope;

And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad
in our hearts,
By the Holy Spirit which is given unto us.
Rom. 5:5

Now may the God of hope fill you with all the joy,
And peace in believing, that you may abound in hope, by the power of
the Holy Spirit.
Romans 15:13

18. The Spirit which comforts;

I will pray the Father, and He shall give you another Comforter,
That may abide with you forever.
John 14: 16

But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the
Father,
Even the Spirit of Truth which preceedeth from the Father, She shall
testify of me.
And ye also shall bear witness, because ye have been with me from
the beginning.
John 15: 26-27

 

 
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