YOGA

When unconscious became conscious this is Samadhi

New Testament is much more dominated by Paul September 20, 2011


http://www.sullivan-county.com/id3/paul_problem.htm

We should remember that the New Testament, as we have it, is much more dominated by Paul than appears at first sight. As we read it, we come across the Four Gospels, of which Jesus is the hero, and do not encounter Paul as a character until we embark on the post-Jesus narrative of Acts. Then we finally come into contact with Paul himself, in his letters. But this impression is misleading, for the earliest writings in the New Testament are actually Paul’s letters, which were written about AD 50-60, while the Gospels were not written until the period AD 70-110. This means that the theories of Paul were already before the writers of the Gospels and coloured their interpretations of Jesus’ activities. Paul is, in a sense, present from the very first word of the New Testament.


 

Paul vs. JESUS July 23, 2011


 

Jesus predicts that God will send a human being to Earth November 28, 2010


“The two Greek verbs `akoub’ and `laleo’ therefore define concrete
actions which can only be applied to a being with hearing and speech
organs. It is consequently impossible to apply them to the Holy
Spirit.

For this reason, the text of this passage from John’s Gospel, as
handed down to us in Greek manuscripts, is quite incomprehensible, if
one takes it as a whole, including the words `Holy Spirit’ in passage
14, 26: “But the Paraclete, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will
send in my name” etc. It is the only passage in John’s Gospel that
identifies the Paraclete with the Holy Spirit.

If the words `Holy Spirit’ (to pneuma to agion) are omitted from the
passage, the complete text of John then conveys a meaning which is
perfectly clear. It is confirmed moreover, by another text from the
same evangelist, the First Letter, where John uses the same
word `Paraclete’ simply to mean Jesus, the intercessor at God’s side.
According to John, when Jesus says (14, 16): “And I will pray the
Father, and he will give you another Paraclete”, what He is saying is
that `another’ intercessor will be sent to man, as He Himself was at
God’s side on man’s behalf during his earthly life.

According to the rules of logic therefore, one is brought to see in
John’s Paraclete a human being like Jesus, possessing the faculties
of hearing and speech formally applied in John’s Greek text, Jesus
therefore predicts that God will later send a human being to Earth to
take up the role defined by John i.e. to be a prophet who hears God’s
words and repeats his message to man. This is the logical
interpretation of John’s texts arrived at if one attributes to the
words their proper meaning.”

Maurice Bucaille, The Bible, the Qur’an, and Science
Islamic Book Service (January 1, 2001), pp. 113-5

 

Democracy July 9, 2009


winston-churchill-democrasy

 

Feminine Gender of the Holy Spirit April 9, 2009


In the most ancient of the rare Old Syriac copies, the Siniatic Palimpsest, from the 4th or 5th century, found in the Covenant of St. Catherine in the Sinia by Mrs. Anes Lewis and transcribed by Syriac Professor R.L. Bensly of Cambridge University in 1892, the words of Jesus in John 14:26 read:

 

“But She—the Spirit-the Paraclete whom He will send to you-my Father-in my name—She will teach you everything; She will remind you of that which I have told you.”

 
 
 
 
 

Grammar Confuses the Nature of the Holy Spirit September 10, 2008


Much of the confusion among English-speaking peoples (and in English translations of the Bible) regarding the nature of the Holy Spirit centers on the Greek language’s use of gender pronouns. Greek, like the Romance languages (Spanish, French, Italian and others), uses a specific gender for every noun. Every object, animate or inanimate, is referred to as being either masculine, feminine or neuter.

A noun’s gender is usually arbitrary and has nothing to do with whether it in reality refers to something masculine or feminine. For example, in French a book, livre, is referred to in the masculine sense, as a “he.” In German, a girl, mädchen, is referred to in the neuter sense, as an “it.” By contrast, in English, nouns that aren’t specifically masculine or feminine are referred to as “it.”

In the New Testament, the words used most often in reference to the Holy Spirit are a mixture of masculine and neuter. The Greek word parakletos is translated “Comforter” or “Helper.” The comforter that Christ promised He would send to the disciples in the 14th, 15th and 16th chapters of John is a masculine word and thus would be referred to by the pronouns “he,” “him,” “his” and “himself” throughout those chapters. However, this is strictly a grammatical tool and not a statement on the nature of the Holy Spirit.

The other word used most often of the Holy Spirit is the Greek word pneuma. It is translated as “breath” or “spirit” and means breath, breeze, wind or spirit. It is the root of our modern word pneumatic, meaning pertaining to or operated by air or wind. Pneuma is a grammatically neuter word and thus should be referred to in English by such neuter terms as “it,” “its” or “itself.”

The translators of the King James Version, influenced by the Trinity doctrine, generally mistranslated pronouns referring to pneuma as masculine rather than neuter. There are a few exceptions in the KJV in which the translation was properly handled, such as Romans 8:16: “The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God.”

Later English translations of the Bible, following the lead of the King James Version, translated references to the Holy Spirit as masculine, thus it is almost always referred to as “he” or “him” in modern versions. GN

— Scott Ashley–

 

The Divine Light July 12, 2008


“It is exactly the beginning of parousia in the holy souls, the
beginning of the revealing at the end of times, when God will be
disclosed to everyone in this distant Light.”

“The most magnetic of all religious symbols is the light, the light
that radiates everywhere within and without — the light that never
was on land or sea. Great mystics have realized the Peerless One in
the form of Light. Moses saw the burning bush and received the word
of God. The Upanishad seers saw It as Jothi Aham — the Splendor in
the self.” – Hinduism Today

“The Bible is seen to be full of terms about light. Lossky tells us
that “for the mystical theology of the eastern Church these are not
metaphors, rhetorical figures but words expressing a real aspect of
godliness.” “The godly light does not have an abstract and
allegorical meaning. It is a data of the mystical experience.” The
author then referred to “Gnostics”, the highest level of godly
knowledge [that] is an experience (a living) of the noncreated light,
where the experience itself is the light: in lumine tuo videbimus
lumen (in Your Light we shall see light.)”

Eternal, endless, existing beyond time and space, it appeared in the
theophanies of the Old Testament as the Glory of God. The Glory
is “the Uncreated Light, His Eternal Kingdom.” Being bestowed to the
Christians by the Holy Spirit, the energies appear no longer as
external causes but as grace, as inner light.” Makarius the Egyptian
wrote: “It is . . . the enlightenment of the holy souls, the
steadiness of the heavenly powers” (Spiritual Homilies V.8.)

“The godly light appears here, in this world, in time. It is
disclosed in the history but it is not of this world; it is eternal,
it means going out from the historical existence: `the secret of the
eight day’, the secret of the true knowledge, the fulfillment of the
Gnosis . . . It is exactly the beginning of parousia in the holy
souls, the beginning of the revealing at the end of times, when God
will be disclosed to everyone in this distant Light.”

Dan Costian, Bible Enlightened

———— ——— ——— ——— ——

“Cultivating the Awareness of the Light Within

The heart and mind can find peace and harmony by contemplating the
transcendental nature of the true self as supreme effulgent light

From the Yoga Sutra of PATANJALI, second century B.C.

Patanjali is often called the father of yoga because he was the first
person to codify and write down yoga practices. In this meditation
instruction, he is telling us to let go of all distracting sights,
smells, and sounds and meditate on our spiritual nature, our luminous
true self. He is telling us to look inside and experience the
radiance within.

All cultures, peoples, and religious groups through all times have
talked about the phenomena of light in the context of the religious
or mystical experience. Those who have seen visions of holy beings
typically see them surrounded by white light. People have always
described going to the light, finding the light, being called by the
light, dissolving in the light. We read about light in The Egyptian
Book of the Dead as well as The Tibetan Book of the Dead. Men, women,
and children who have had classic near-death experiences vividly
describe arriving in a place of white light; they speak of themselves
and others as being bathed in white light.

Prior to being described as the light of any religion, light was just
light. Light is a part of the primary source material. Later, as the
history of mankind developed, the concept of light became
institutionalized; it was then interpreted according to cultural and
religious beliefs. Pure light thus became light of God, light of
truth, light of Buddha, light of Jesus, cosmic light, and ocean of
light depending upon where you were born and what you were taught.

Light, however, is constant. It is fundamental energy.

The New Testament, referring to John the Baptist, reads: “He came for
testimony, to bear witness to the light that all might believe
through him.” Later Jesus says, “Put your trust in the light while
you have it so that you may become sons of light.”…

British mystic George Fox, who founded the Quaker religion, used the
term “inner light” to describe our ability to personally experience
God within ourselves. He himself had such an experience, which left
him with the lifelong conviction that everyone can hear God’s voice
directly without mediation by priests or church ritual. This is the
central tenet of the Society of Friends.

According to Buddhism, all beings are imbued with a spark of inner
divine light. In describing our original Buddha-nature, we use such
phrases as innate luminosity, primordial radiance, the unobscured
clear natural mind, and the clear light of reality…. The Jewish
mystics use similar words when they speak of the inner spark or the
spark of God. The Koran, referring to man, talks about the little
candle flame burning in a niche in the wall of God’s temple.

Almost inevitably a spiritual search becomes a search for divine or
sacred light. By cultivating our inner core, we search for this light
in ourselves as well as the divine.”- Lama Surya Das, Awakening to the Sacred

“We are now Sahaja Yogis but we were ordinary human beings. We had no
Light within us. Now the Light comes within us and we see the Light
then what do we become? We have to become the Light itself. Christ
was the Light. He did not have to become. We have to become the
Light. And now you have to guard on the way this Light might get
disturbed, might be reduced or maybe completely extinguished.

So carrying on yourself with this Light first thing you should
know that if you see the Light is not proper means you are not the
Light. You have to become the Light. When you are the Light, then in
that Light you can easily see how your mind works, what ideas it
gives, what affects your mind while you’re ascending. Is this the
worry or is this the responsibility that you have? Or is this from
the bad habits you had, that there is an impediment in your growth as
a spiritual personality?

So you have to guard yourself all the time and see for yourself how
you are progressing. It’s a very beautiful journey — very, very
beautiful journey.”

Sri Mataji Nirmala Devi
Rome, Italy — April 11, 1993

 

Elaine Pagels, The Gnostic Gospels, 1989, p. 49-50. July 11, 2008


“A second characterization of the divine Mother describes her as Holy
Spirit. The Apocryphon of John relates how John went out after the
crucifixion with “great grief” and had a mystical vision of the
Trinity. As John was grieving, he says that:

The [heavens were opened and the whole] creation [which is] under
heaven shone and [the world] trembled. [And I was afraid, and I] saw
in the light . . . a likeness with multiple forms . . . and the
likeness had three forms. [14]

To John’s question the vision answers: “He said to me, `John, Jo[h]n,
why do you doubt, and why are you afraid? . . . I am the one who [is
with you] always. I [am the Father]; I am the Mother; I am the Son.”
[15]

This Gnostic description of God — as Father, Mother and Son — may
startle us at first, but on reflection we can recognize it as another
version of the Trinity. The Greek terminology for the Trinity, which
includes the neuter term for spirit (pneuma) virtually requires that
the third “Person” of the Trinity be asexual. But the author of the
Secret Book has in mind the Hebrew term for spirit, ruah, a feminine
word; and so concludes that the feminine “Person” conjoined with the
Father and Son must be the Mother. The Secret Book goes on to
describe the divine Mother:

. . . (She is) . . . the image of the invisible, virginal, perfect
spirit . . . She became the Mother of everything, for she existed
before them all, the mother-father [matropater] . . . [16]

The Gospel to the Hebrews likewise has Jesus speak of “my Mother, the
Spirit.” [17] In the Gospel of Thomas, Jesus contrasts his earthly
parents, Mary and Joseph, with his divine Father — the Father of
Truth — and his divine Mother, the Holy Spirit.”

(14. Apocryphon of John 1.31-2.9, in nhl 99; 15. Ibid., 2.2-14, in
nhl 99; 16. Ibid., 4.34-5.7, in nhl 101; 17. Gospel to the Hebrews,
cited in Origen, comm. jo. 2.12.) (14. Apocryphon of John 1.31-2.9,
in nhl 99; 15. Ibid., 2.2-14, in nhl 99; 16. Ibid., 4.34-5.7, in nhl
101; 17. Gospel to the Hebrews, cited in Origen, comm. jo. 2.12.)

Elaine Pagels, The Gnostic Gospels, 1989, p. 49-50.
Paperback: 224 pages
Publisher: Vintage (September 19, 1989)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0679724532
ISBN-13: 978-0679724537

Brings up questions of what might have been…, November 24, 2002
By M. Nichols (San Francisco, CA United States)

Elaine Pagels is a first-rate religious historian– currently a
professor at Princeton– and “The Gnostic Gospels” is her best known
work, examining the contents of “secret” gospels written after the
death of Jesus which were rejected from canonization and therefore
are largely unknown to Bible-reading Christians.

What is most interesting to consider is just how different
Christianity might be today if additional writings had been included
in the Bible. One theory as to why they weren’t was that early
bishops wanted only gospels written by Jesus’s apostles included in
the Bible, although subsequent scholarship has proven that none of
the Gospels’ authorship is certain. Among the rejected, the Gospel of
Thomas is probably the best known, and it is fascinating in its non-
literal approach to Christ. Jesus is described as telling his
followers that the Kingdom of God is not a realm (Pagels concludes
that it is closer to an altered state of consciousness) and makes
comments that place him closer in philosophy to the Buddha than to
St. Paul.

A lot is covered in just 180 pages — Pagels gets credit for being
among the least self-indulgent writers around. She lays down the
facts and then lets the reader mull over them. No matter what your
beliefs, you will benefit from reading this book.

———— ——— —-

Outstanding scholarly work, April 11, 2007
By Gaetan Lion

Originally written nearly 30 years ago, this book remains a must-read
on the subject. Elaine Pagels is a renowned scholar with a Harvard
Ph.D. in religion. She directly studied and translated some of the
Nag Hammadi manuscripts in the early seventies. Her related research
represents the foundation of this book. She later became a Princeton
professor. She wrote several seminal books on Christianity. Her
lifelong work has significantly advanced our knowledge of early
Christianity.

Each chapter focuses on a specific tenet of Christianity and stresses
the differences between Gnostic and orthodox Christians. While the
orthodox Christians believe in the physical reality of Jesus’
resurrection, the immaculate conception of Jesus, and martyrdom; the
Gnostic Christians interpret the resurrection in a spiritual way (not
a literal one). They also do not believe in the Immaculate
Conception. And, they reject martyrdom as a fanatical practice not
reflecting Jesus’ teachings.

The Gnostic Christians don’t believe in the orthodox Christians’
hierarchy. Gnostic Christians believe each of us has direct access to
God. And, that orthodox bishops and priests represent unwanted
obstacles to this access. Additionally, Gnostic Christians do not
exclude women as the sexes are equal in front of God. They even
revere God as both the Father and the Mother. Also, they don’t
consider Mary Magdalene to be a woman of ill repute, but instead an
equal if not a superior to the twelve apostles.

For Gnostic Christians, the overarching factor is how much gnosis
(knowledge) a believer has. This also entails wisdom and maturity.
Gnosis is means knowledge based on empirical firsthand experience in
Greek. It entails self-knowledge or “know thyself” a key concept in
Greek philosophy (Aristotle, Plato, Socrates). For Gnostic Christian
this concept is so important that knowing self ultimately leads to
knowing God. Thus, there is no separation between God and the
individual. This underlines the drastic difference between Gnostic
and orthodox Christians. The author mentions that this concept leads
to Gnosticism having a significant influence on modern Existentialism.

———— ——— ——— –

Should be read by anyone who considers him/herself Christian,
December 8, 1998
By jcw@princeton. edu (JW) (Princeton, NJ)

The Gnostic Gospels is a truly mind-liberating, eye-opening piece of
historical analysis that I would recommend to anyone, especially
those from a “Christian” background. It addresses the fact that our
knowledge of modern Christianity is based on four gospels in the New
Testament that lay the foundations for Christian doctrine, i.e., that
Jesus’ resurrection be understood literally, that the Trinity
consists of Father, Son and Holy Ghost, and that one is “originally”
sinful and must accept Jesus as his/her savior. This modern doctrine,
in my opinion, leads to self-denial and an “easy way out”- overly
simply explanations which lead to close-mindedness. In my experience,
mass religion has little value- it is one’s personal philosophy and
individual spiritual development that I think is essential for one to
be truly religious and spiritually alive.

For this reason the Gnostic
Gospels struck me profoundly. It revealed the fact that these four
Gospels (selected by the orthodox church to institute this religion)
were among SCORES of gospels about Jesus’ teachings, some of which
are very likely to be more historically accurate than those found in
the Bible. This alternative philosophy and teaching of Jesus
encourages bringing out one’s true self and coming to know oneself in
order to get close to God. It speaks of God as both masculine and
feminine. In a sense it resembles Buddhism. More importantly, I
believe these gnostic texts (which weren’t discovered until 1945
in Egypt) contain a truer, more meaningful message that can be
applied to an individual’s life.

This book has reconciled me with Christianity, for I agree with – and try to learn from – many of the Gnostic teachings. Unfortunately, as these teachings encourage one to
ask questions and go one’s own way (rather than blindly accepting
what society preaches), it was impossible for the church to
institutionalize Christianity without selecting only certain, “easy
answer” texts which allowed the church to legitimize the Bishops’
authority over people.

Above all, Pagels’s study demands that we
reconsider our interpretation of history and realize that what we
know of as “Christianity” remains very limited. Anyone even slightly
interested in religion should read The Gnostic Gospels; its
uncommon ability to help us de-provincialize ourselves requires only
one essential tool: an open mind.

 

The Holy Spirit: The Feminine Aspect Of the Godhead July 10, 2008


The Holy Spirit:
The Feminine Aspect Of the Godhead

J. J. Hurtak, PhD, The Academy For Future Science

“There is currently much talk of “feminine issues,” particularly in
social and political contexts. This growing awareness of gender-
related matters was not something ignored by the early Church and the
writers of ancient religious texts. As we see in this article by Dr.
Hurtak, the notion of femininity played an extremely important and
significant role in the thinking and belief system of the
intertestamental authors. Far from being the overbearing patriarchal
advocates as they are often portrayed, more recent findings reveal an
innate sensitivity and appreciation for the feminine aspect of
Divinity than has been previously suspected. For this reason, this
particular article becomes a meaningful and insightful contribution
to the current discussion of the role of the female in modern times.
Once more we find a rich and profound history reshaping the future
even as it unfolds before our eyes.

A new response to the “image” of the Holy Spirit is taking shape
quietly in scholarly circles throughout the world, as the result of
new findings in the Dead Sea Scriptures, the Coptic Nag Hammadi and
intertestamental texts of Jewish mystics found side-by-side the
writings of the early Christian church. Scholars are recognizing the
Holy Spirit as the “female vehicle” for the outpouring of higher
teaching and spiritual rebirth. The Holy Spirit plays varied roles in
Judeo-Christian traditions: acting in Creation, imparting wisdom, and
inspiring Old Testament prophets. In the New Testament She is the
presence of God in the world and a power in the birth and life of
Jesus.

The Holy Spirit became well-established as part of a circumincession,
a partner in the Trinity with the Father and Son after doctrinal
controversies of the late 4th century AD solidified the position of
the Western Church. Although all Christian Churches accept the union
of three persons in one Godhead, the Eastern Church, particularly the
communities of the Greek, Ethiopian, Armenian, and Russian, do not
solidify a strong union of personalities, but see the figures
uniquely differentiated, but still in union. Moreover, the Eastern
Church places the Holy Spirit as the Second Person of the Trinity
with Christ as the Third, whereas the Western Church places the Son
before the Holy Spirit. In the Old Testament and the Dead Sea Scrolls
the Holy Spirit was known as the Ruach or Ruach Ha Kodesh (Psalm
51:11). In the New Testament as Pneuma (Romans 8:9). The Holy Spirit
was not rendered as “Holy Ghost” until the appearance of the 1611
Protestant King James Version of the Bible. For the most part, Ruach
or Pneuma have been considered the spiritual force or presence of
God. The power of this force can be seen in the Christian church as
the “gifts of the Spirit” (especially in today’s tongues-speaking
Pentecostals) . The Holy Spirit was also a source for Divine guidance
and as the indwelling Comforter.

Likewise in Hebrew thought, Ruach Ha Kodesh was considered a voice
sent from on high to speak to the Prophet. Thus, in the Old Testament
language of the prophets, She is the Divine Spirit of indwelling
sanctification and creativity and is considered as having a feminine
power. “He” as a reference to Spirit has been used in theology to
match the pronoun for God, yet the Hebrew word ruach is a noun of
feminine gender. Thus, referring to the Holy Spirit as “she” has some
linguistic justification. Denoting Spirit as a feminine principle,
the creative principle of life, makes sense when considering the
Trinity aspect where Father plus Spirit leads to the Divine Extension
of Divine Sonship.

The Spirit is not called “it” despite the fact that pneuma in Greek
is a neuter noun. Church doctrine regards the Holy Spirit as a
person, not a force like magnetism. The writings of the Catholic
fathers, in fact, preserve the vision of the Spirit encapsulating
the “peoplehood of Christ” as the Bride or as the “Mother Church.”
Both are feminine aspects of the Divine. In the Eastern Church,
Spirit was always considered to have a feminine nature. She was the
life-bearer of the faith. Clement of Alexandria states that “she” is
an indwelling Bride. Amongst the Eastern Church communities there is
none more clear about the feminine aspect of the Holy Spirit as the
corpus of the Coptic-Gnostics. One such document records that Jesus
says, “Even so did my mother, the Holy Spirit, take me by one of my
hairs and carry me away to the great mountain Tabor [in Galilee].”

The 3rd century scroll of mystical Coptic Christianity, The Acts of
Thomas, gives a graphic account of the Apostle Thomas’ travels to
India, and contains prayers invoking the Holy Spirit as “the Mother
of all creation” and “compassionate mother,” among other titles. The
most profound Coptic Christian writings definitely link the “spirit
of Spirit” manifested by Christ to all believers as the “Spirit of
the Divine Mother.” Most significant are the new manuscript
discoveries of recent decades which have demonstrated that more early
Christians than previously thought regarded the Holy Spirit as the
Mother of Jesus.

One text is the Gospel of Thomas which is part of the newly
discovered Nag Hammadi texts (discovered 1945-1947). Most are
composed about the same time as the Biblical gospels in the 1st and
2nd century AD. In this gospel, Jesus declares that his disciples
must hate their earthly parents (as in Luke 14:26) but love the
Father and Mother as he does, “for my mother (gave me falsehood), but
(my) true Mother gave me life.” In another Nag Hammadi discovery, The
Secret Book of James, Jesus refers to himself as “the son of the Holy
Spirit.” These two sayings do not identify the Holy Spirit as the
mothering vehicle of Jesus, but more than one scholar has interpreted
them to mean that the maternal Holy Spirit is intended.

So far in Western traditional theology, the voices advocating a
feminine Holy Spirit are scattered and subtle. But for them, it is a
view theologically defensible and accompanied by psychological,
sociological, and scientific benefits of recognizing “the new
supernature” developing within vast consciousness changes happening
in the human evolution.

The German theologian Jürgen Moltmann, a well-known thinker in
mainline Protestantism, says “monotheism is monarchism.” He says a
traditional idea of God’s absolute power “generally provides the
justification for earthly domination”- – -from the emperors and
despots of history to 20th century dictators. Moltmann argues for a
new appreciation of the “persons” of the Trinity and the community or
family model it presents for human relations.

According to Professor Neil Q. Hamilton at Drew University School of
Theology, the Gospel of John shows us how “the Holy Spirit begins to
perform a mothering role for us that is unconditional acceptance,
love and caring.” God then begins to parent us in father and mother
modes.

A Catholic scholar, Franz Mayr, a philosophy professor at the
University of Portland, also favors the recognition of the Holy
Spirit as feminine. He contends that the traditional unity of God
would not have to be watered down in order for scholars to accept the
feminine side of God . Mayr, who studied under the renown German
theologian Karl Rahner, said he came to his view during his study of
the writings of St. Augustine (AD 354-430) who saw that a significant
number of early Christians must have accepted a feminine aspect of
the Holy Spirit such that the influential church father of North
Africa castigated this view. St. Augustine claimed that the
acceptance of the Holy Spirit as the “mother of the Son of God and
wife-consort of the Father” was merely a pagan outlook. But Mayr
contends that Augustine “skipped over the social and maternal aspect
of God,” which Mayr thinks is best seen in the Holy Spirit, the
Divine Ruach Ha Kodesh. St. Jerome, a contemporary of Augustine’s,
and two church fathers of an earlier period, Clement of Alexandria
and Origen, quoted from the pseudopigraphic Gospel of the Hebrews,
which depicted the Holy Spirit as a “mother figure.”

A 14th Century fresco in a small Catholic Church southeast of Munich,
Germany depicts a female Spirit as part of the Holy Trinity,
according to Leonard Swidler of Temple University. The woman and two
bearded figures flanking her appear to be wrapped in a single cloak
and joined in their lower halves showing a union of old and new
bodies of birth and rebirth.

In conclusion, we are living at a time of profound and revelatory
discoveries of archaeology and ancient spiritual texts that point the
way to the future. Christ, himself, was said to have female disciples
as disclosed in Gnostic literature and recent archeological findings
of early Christian tombs in Italy. A beginning has been made to
reclaim “the Spirit” of the Ruach found in the mountain of newly
discovered pre-Christian texts and Coptic-Egyptian texts of the early
Church . It is becoming clear in re-examining the first 100 years of
Christianity that an earlier Christianity was closer to the “Feminine
Spirit” of the Old Testament, the Ruach or the beloved Shekinah. The
Shekinah, distinct from the Ruach, was seen as the indwelling Divine
Presence that activated the “birth of miracles” or the anointed self.
Accordingly, the growth of traditional Christianity made alternative
adjustments of the original position of the “birth of gifts” as
Christendom compromised for the privilege of becoming an
establishment.

The new directions of spiritual and scientific studies are showing
that it is now possible that the Holy Spirit, Ruach Ha Kodesh, can be
portrayed as feminine as the indwelling presence of God, the
Shekinah, nurturing and bringing to birth souls for the kingdom.
Spiritual insights recorded in the Book of Knowledge: Keys of Enoch
carefully remind us that we are being prepared to understand that
just as the Old Testament was the Age of the Father, the New
Testament the Age of the Son, so this coming Age where gifts are
poured forth will be the Age of the Holy Spirit.”

J. J. Hurtak, PhD, The Academy For Future Science

 

The Christian Goddess July 1, 2008


“Many theologians and scholars believe the Holy Spirit written as,
Pneuma in Greek every time it appears in the New Testament, is a
feminine being. Note that Pneuma is a neuter word in Greek, but in
Hebrew the word Ruah (Spirit) and in Aramaic the word Shekinah
(Presence) are feminine words and imply a feminine divine presence.
The Holy Spirit is possibly a Christian Goddess, not a mysterious
invisible member of an all-male Trinity “club.” Or more
provocatively, maybe there is a Feminine Trinity of God-the-Mother
(Sophia and Mary?), God-the-Daughter (Mary Magdalene) and Goddess-the-
Spirit-Presence (Shekinah, Ruah). The Holy Spirit appears at Yeshua’s
baptism in the form of a dove. The dove has long been a symbol of the
Goddess in the Ancient Near East, and was never used to symbolize any
male Being or God.

We must also look in the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, and
consider the Goddess Sophia. Her name means “Wisdom.” She is the
Goddess of Wisdom referred to repeatedly in scripture as the wife of
God-the-Father. See Proverbs, Song of Songs, (also called Song of
Solomon) in the Hebrew Bible, and see the Book of Sirach and the Book
of Wisdom in the Apocrypha found in the center of any Catholic Bible.

Here is an excerpt from “The Decline of the Feminine and the Cult of
Mary In Greco-Roman Christianity” , probably because of the dangers of
Gnosticism, the biblical images of God as female were soon suppressed
within the doctrine of God. God as Wisdom, Hokmah in Hebrew, or
Sophia in Greek, a feminine form, was translated by Christianity into
the Logos concept of Philo, which is masculine and was defined as the
Son of God. The Shekinah, the theology of God’s mediating presence as
female, was de-emphasized; and God’s Spirit Ruah, a feminine noun in
Hebrew, took on a neuter form when translated into Greek as Pneuma.

The Vulgate translated Ruah into Latin as masculine, Spiritus. God’s
Spirit, Ruah, which at the beginning of creation brings forth
abundant life in the waters, makes the womb of Mary fruitful. In
spite of the reality of the caring, consoling, healing aspects of
divine activity, the dominant patriarchal tradition has prevailed,
resulting in seeing the female as the passive recipient of God’s
creation; and the female is expressed in nature, church, soul, and
finally Mary as the prototype of redeemed humanity. Because God as
father has become an over literalized metaphor, the symbol of God as
mother is eclipsed. The problem lies not in the fact that male
metaphors are used for God, but that they are used exclusively and
literally. Because images of God as female have been suppressed in
official formulations and teaching, they came to be embodied in the
figure of Mary who functioned to reveal the unfailing love of God.”

The Christian Goddess
http://www.northernway.org/goddess. html

 

 
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