YOGA

When unconscious became conscious this is Samadhi

Yoga Philosophy of Jnaneshvara and Patanjali December 11, 2008


Yoga Philosophy of Jnaneshvara and Patanjali

by G. K. Pungaliya
President, Institute of Yoga and Allied Research, Pune, India

Two sources of ancient Indian thought are Vedas and Agamas. Even if the ultimate aim of both the systems was to attain liberation, or to experience the ultimate truth, or Brahman or Moksha or Nirvana, their teachings, ideologies and philosophies were different, on a number of basic issues and principles. Vedas and Upanishads presume, as is stated in Mahabharata (1) etc. that the originator of the science of the Yoga is Hiranyagarbha. The tradition of Agamas says that the author of this science of Yoga is Adinatha or Shiva or Shankara. Almost all these Agamas are written in the form of conversation between Parvati and Shankara. Patanjali is following the tradition of Upanishads. The philosophy behind Patanjali Darshana is that Sankhya, the Astanga Yoga which Patanjali propagated was in vogue several centuries before Patanjali (300 BC).

We get references of Astanga Yoga in a number of Upanishads such as Chandogya Upanishad, Sandilya Upanishad etc. Yajnavalkya explains this Yoga Philosophy to Gargi and other disciples exactly on the same lines as Patanjali does. (2) Yajnavalkya further states that this philosophy of Astanga Yoga was being learnt by him from his masters. This is an indication of the fact that the philosophy of Astanga Yoga is very ancient and was already in practice before Patanjali.

Hence, it is quite natural that whatever Patanjali has stated is on the basis of certain principles of Upanishads and the philosophy of Sankhya. Of course, Patanjali has his own contribution to Yoga Sutras. The concept of Ishvara, even if absent in Sankhya Darshana, has been defined by Patanjali as per PYS 1. 240. (3) However, he is having his own interpretation about this concept and it is not according to the established tradition. His Ishvara is not a creator but a person whose sins are destroyed. Patanjali’s concept of Ishvara is very near to Jain Darshana. (4)

Jnaneshvara, had altogether a different background. He was initiated as per the tradition of Nath Sampradaya. This philosophy is different from that of Patanjali’s Yoga Darshana. The basic principles of Yoga philosophy of Nath Panth, are stated in detail in various books such as Gorakshagita, Goraksha Paddhati, Siddha Siddhanta Paddhati, Amaraugha Sasana, Amaraugha Prabodha, Mahartha Manjari, Gheranda Samhita, etc., all written in Sanskrit. Hence, the Yoga Philosophy of Jnaneshvara is just like a mirror reflection of the Yoga Philosophy of Nath Panth. From this it is quite obvious that the original sources of philosophy of these two great saint philosophers and seers are quite different. Thus there is bound to be a major difference in their Yoga Systems. In this paper, therefore, I intend to point out certain outstanding differences in their Yoga Philosophies.

In the overall Yoga Philosophy, we find a number of branches, out of which the most popular now-a-days, in India and abroad, is the one which has been advocated by Patanjali and which is known as Astanga Yoga. Yoga Sutras of Patanjali are translated in various languages and also a number of commentaries have been written on it. However, there are a number of other Yoga systems such as Hatha Yoga, Kundalini Yoga, Laya Yoga, Mantra Yoga, Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga etc. Since this paper is intended for only the comparison between the Yoga of Jnaneshvara and Patanjali, I would restrict my scope to the comparison of philosophies of only these two masters.

The basic differences are as under:

1. Patanjali gives the system of Astanga Yoga per his Sutra No. 11. 29 (5) of Yoga Sutras. The Yoga System of Jnaneshvara is based on the principles of Hatha Yoga. Some of the scholars of this system are following Astanga Yoga. However, great Yogis such as Gorakshanath are following the system of Sadanga Yoga which has been stated by him in his book Goraksha Paddhati 1.7. (6) This System avoids Yamaand Niyama. The justification given by those Yogis is that if you obtain mastery in meditation, your whole lifestyle gets changed in such a way, that you automatically start following the Yama and Niyamawhich are the necessary rules and individual rules of conduct respectively. These six aspects of Yoga are:

Physical Postures
Pranayama
Pratyahara
Dharana
Dhyana
Samadhi

2. According to the Nath Cult it is most important that the aspirant should purify his body completely. This has been stated in detail in Gheranda Samhita l.10-11-12. (7) This is a total purification of all important and vital organs of the body such as stomach, small intestines, large intestines, nasal passage, food pipe, eyes, ears, throat, etc. After this the cult says that the aspirant is in a position to undertake all the steps of Yoga. In Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras this preparation of initial background is not mentioned.

3. The next step (in other Yoga systems) is the learning of physical postures. However, after learning all the important postures, the aspirant has to practise the most essential posture viz. Siddhasana or Vajrasana. For all the future Sadhanas this is considered to be the basic and important posture. The detailed description of this posture is given by Jnaneshvara in his sixth chapter of Jnaneshvari and also by a number of books of Nath Cult. They say that this posture is a must for all the aspirants. However, Patanjali says that you can sit in any convenient posture you like. Hence he gives the Sutra “Sthira-sukham asanam.”

4. The importance of a Guru or Master is maximum in Nath cult. Their every book or Shastra starts by remembering or bowing with great reverence and respect to the Guru Adinath or Shiva or Shankara. Jnaneshvari also starts like this by saying “Om Namoji Adya.” This importance is not given to Guru in Patanjala Yoga Darshana.

5. The Nath cult says that the human body consists of certain most essential centres or vital points and voids (Akasha). (8) Every aspirant has to know and understand these things. They say that one who is not aware of these essential centres is not a Yogi. They are six Chakras, sixteen vital points, two Laksyas (concentration points), five voids, all situated within the human body. Such type of discussion is not found in Patanjala Yoga Darshana.

6. Nath cult says that the human body is just like a beautiful house which is having nine doors. (9) It is formed out of five essential elements and each element is having its own deity. The nine openings are two eyes, two nostrils, two ear holes, mouth, excreta outlet, and sex organ. The deity of Earth is Brahma, of water is Vishnu, of fire is Rudra, of air is Ishvara and of space is Sadashiva. Every aspirant has to understand these things. In Patanjala Sutras we do not find this.

7. The Nath Panth, in their various books as mentioned above, gives a detailed description of the seven chakras, their exact location in the body, their properties and functions etc. Jnaneshvara has not given the description of these chakras for the reason that he wanted to restrict his interpretation to the verses of Bhagavad-Gita. At the base of the spinal cord and at the centre of the line which connects sex organ and the excreta outlet is situated the first chakra which is known as Muladhara Chakra. Slightly above the sex centre and below the naval centre the second chakra is situated which is known as Svadhisthana Chakra. The third is situated near the naval centre and is called Manipura.

The fourth one is situated near the heart centre and is known as Anahata Chakra. The fifth is situated at the throat centre and is known as Visuddha Chakra. It must be noted that all these chakras are situated in the Shushumna Nadi which passes through the spinal cord, which again passes through Vertebral Column. These are extremely subtle points and may not be structural and cannot be located by any sophisticated instrument available. These were actually ‘observed’ and seen by the great Rishis in the stage of Samadhi. Here come the limitations of modern science. The sixth chakra is situated on the forehead and between the centre of the two eyebrows. This is known as Ajna Chakra. The seventh and the last chakra is situated in the centre of the brain in its uppermost portion. Patanjali does not mention any such thing in his Yoga Sutras.

8. According to Nath Cult there are 72.000 nerves in the body of human beings. (10) Out of these ten Nadis are important. Out of these three are most important. They are known as Ida, Pingala and Shushumna. Ida is known as Chandra Nadi and is passing through the left side of the vertebral column. Pingala is known as Surya Nadi and is passing through the right side of the vertebral column. Shushumna Nadi is passing through the spinal cord and is known as Agni Nadi. Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras do not mention all this. He does mention a few Nadis like Kurma Nadi. But the detailed description is absent.

9. The concept of Prana has been studied in maximum details in Nath Cult. They say that in the human body there are ten different types of air or Vayus (11), which are known as Prana, Apana, Samana, Udana, Vyana, Naga, Kurma, Krikala, Devadatta and Dhananjaya. Each one is situated in a specific part of the body. Each one is having specific purpose and function in the body. When we take the air inside our body, it gets bifurcated into ten branches. This is just like a stream of water which starts from the Himalayan Mountains and gets bifurcated into several branches and each branch becomes a river and is given a separate name. Present medical science is not in a position to locate these ten different types of airs. However, our ancient Yogis have actually ‘seen’ these different streams of air inside our body. This type of description is not found in Patanjala Sutras.

10. When we breathe in there is a subtle sound which is known as ‘So’ and when we breathe out there is a subtle sound which is known as ‘Ham’. (12) Everyone can experience this with slight practice. This sound of ‘Soham’ is continuously going on with every breathing. In a period of one day, that is twenty-four hours, we take 21.600 breathings. That means this type of sound which is known as Mantra, is being continued in our body for that many number of times (21.600). If the aspirant observes this mentally and consciously, this becomes a great Sadhana. This Sadhana is being given very great importance in the Nath Cult. This is not found in Patanjala Yoga Sutras (PYS).

11. The most important aspect of the Yoga Sadhana of Jnaneshvara is the activation of the Kundalini Shakti. This is a Tantric Sadhana of the Nath Cult. Jnaneshvara has given a detailed account of this process in his sixth chapter. This is a practical application of the philosophy of Nath Panth. They say that the whole universe is created out of the energy of Shiva or Mahashiva or Adinatha. They call it Shakti or cosmic energy. This energy is occupying the whole universe. The smallest portion of this energy is known as Kundalini, and the energy which is present in the entire universe is known as Maha Kundalini. This energy is present in human beings in potential form (Supta Shakti).

The Yogis who have experienced this energy, say that this is like a serpent and is situated at the end of the Shushumna Nadi in a coiled form, in three and a half coils, position. This also is in line with their philosophy which says “Bramhandi te Pindi”. This means that whatever exists in the universe also exists in the human being in the subtle form. Nath Cult and their great masters like Gorakshanath have devised various ways and means to activate this energy. Saint Jnaneshvara has described one method of activating this energy. This method has been stated in almost all the books of Hatha Yoga and Natha Panth and some Upanishads. The detailed description is available in the sixth chapter of Jnaneshvari. This energy can also be activated by Mantra Yoga, Laya Yoga and Bhakti Yoga. That is why we find in Jnaneshvari all these systems of Upasana.

The ultimate stage of realisation or Moksha as per this colt is the union of Shakti with Shiva. Hence the aspirant initiated in this cult has to activate this energy and allow this energy to go through all the six chakras gradually. The place of Shiva is considered to be in the last chakra which is known as Sahasrara. In the ultimate stage, Sadhaka has to transfer this energy to this last chakra. This is supposed to be the point of union of Shakti with Shiva. One who is successful in this process, is supposed to be a great Yogi. A number of spiritual powers known as siddhis are at his disposal in that stage. A number of examples are available in the ancient Shastras about the Yogis, who were successful in obtaining this highest stage. Jnaneshvara had experienced the above union with Shiva and hence he is known as Maha Yogi. In PYS we do not find anything about Kundalini Shakti.

12. In Nath cult there is a great importance of a Gun or Master. He is given the same importance as is given to their ultimate Guru Adinath. That is why Jnaneshvara is giving maximum importance to his Guru Nivrittinath and is mentioning his name in Jnaneshvari at a number of places. Not only that, he gives the entire credit of writing this book to Nivrittinath. Their philosophy says that the aspirant can get the ultimate experience of truth or Shiva only with the continuous guidance of Guru or the Master. We find that every book of Nath Panth starts after bowing to Guru.

13. In this cult we find a mystic and esoteric act of the transfer of spiritual energy from the master to the initiated aspirant and the act is known as Shaktipata. With the tremendous powers of the master, he can activate the Kundalini energy of the disciple. This transfer, he can do by touching a specific part of his body or simply by looking at him. This transfer of energy can be done on the aspirant who is at a great distance from the master. This is a peculiar mystical act. After the transfer of energy, the aspirant experiences a number of supernatural things, a tremendous flow (of liquid) light, etc. However, those scholars who are really anxious, should go through the book Awakening of Kundalini written by Pandit Gopi Krishna, who had undergone all these experiences before about twenty-five years in Kashmir. The concept of Shaktipata is not found in PYS.

14. This cult gives a great importance to the practice of certain physical postures known as Mudras. They are useful in meditation and also in the activation of Kundalini energy and the six chakras. Hence every aspirant has to learn these Mudras. The ancient texts say that such Mudras arc twenty-five. Out of these ten are most important. With the practice of Mudras the aspirant is in a position to get rid of any and every disease and can acquire a number of supernatural powers. Because of these multiple advantages, the aspirant is taught these postures and after he achieves this experience, he is taught Pranayama. Mudras arc nowhere mentioned in PYS.

15. There is a difference between the Dhyana-meditation of Patanjali and Jnaneshvara. Patanjali gives the definition of Dhyana as per Sutra No. III.1 and III 2 which are as under. The aspirant has to concentrate on specific or vital part of the body or on some external point. This process is known as Dharana. When the aspirant gets success in the concentration on that particular point, for a sufficiently long time, it becomes a Dhyana. For the concentration on that particular point, the aspirant has to use his mind. However, in Kundalini Yoga, the aspirant has not to use his mind at all. He has to practise Kumbhaka, wherein the function of mind totally stops. Instead of concentrating on any particular point, the aspirant has to activate the Kundalini energy. This is a much superior way. This opinion has been confirmed by Sir John Woodroffe, in his book The Serpent Power on page No. 314 and 315 of the eleventh edition, which the learned scholars and philosophers can refer to any time.

16. Patanjali gives a broad division of Samadhi, which is termed as SamprajnataSamadhi and Asamprajnata Samadhi. However, the stage of Samadhi has been studied in details by the Nath cult and which is followed by Jnaneshvara in toto. Nath cult has categorised Samadhi in six types which are known as I ) Dhyana Yoga Samadhi, 2) Nada Yoga Samadhi, 3) Rasananda Yoga Samadhi, 4) Laya yoga Samadhi, 5) Bhakti Yoga Samadhi, and 6) Raja Yoga Samadhi. How each Samadhi can be experienced is also discussed in details. Scholars and philosophers can refer chapter seven of Gheranda Samhita which gives the entire description.

To conclude, I would like to state that both these systems of Yoga are different. The reason is obvious. Their philosophical base is altogether different. That is why the Yoga of Nath Panth accommodates Hatha Yoga, Kundalini Yoga, Mantra Yoga, and Bhakti Yoga. This Yoga Philosophy is therefore multi-dimensional. Besides the results here are very fast. This has been promised by Gorakshanath in his book. However, it is advisable that the practices of this Yoga should be undertaken under an able and experienced master. To end the paper, I would like to quote the verse No. IV.114 (13) from Hatha Yoga Pradipika. It says that till you are not in a position to activate the Kundalini energy, till you are not in a position to have perfect control over your pranic force, till you are not in a position to clear the path of Shushumna Nadi, all your knowledge is external, futile and full of ego. It is only an exercise of talking and nothing else. Hence he says that this is a process which has to be experienced only.

References:

Jnanesvari by Sakhare Maharaj.
Goraksa-paddhati by Gorakshanath.
Gheranda Samhita – Commentary by Shree Swamiji Maharaj.
Hatha-yoga-Pradipika by Shree Swatmarama Yogi
Patanjala Yoga (Sutra) Pradipa by Swami Omananda Tirtha.
Patanjala Yoga Darsana by K.K. Kolhatkar
Yoga Yajnavalkya
Siddha-Siddhanta-Paddhati by Gorakshanath
Shiva-Samhita – Commentary by Dr. K.R. Joshi

 

SHRI DEVI GITA June 28, 2008


SHRI DEVI GITA
by Shri Giridhar Madras

Introduction:

Devi gita constitutes the last ten chapters of the seventh Skandha
of the Devi Bhagavatam. In the puranas, one will find several gitas
and many mahatmyas. The differences are that in the mahatmya, the
glorification of the deity is by recounting the various deeds of the
God and offering praise to the divinity. A gita, on the other hand,
is a direct revelation of the truth from the disciple, which often
includes the manifestation of the cosmic form. While mahatymas
emphasize bhakti, gita stresses a balance of bhakti and jnana.

Specifically, we are interested in discussing the Devi gita. To
avoid any confusion and also be aware, there are two other devi
gitas. The first of which is found in the Kurma purana. This is a
conversation with Parvati and Himavan, introduced by Lord Vishnu as
Kurma. Goddess Parvati is praised here by 1008 names and She grants
him two cosmic visions and instructs him. The other devi gita is
found in the Mahabhagavata purana, which actually refers to the
conversation of Parvati and Himavan as Parvati Gita. The narrator of
this section of the Mahabhagavata Purana is Lord Shiva. However, by
Devi gita, we refer only to the gita found in the Devi Bhagavatam.

Setting:

The setting of the Devi gita is introduced by Janamejaya’s query
to Vyasa regarding the supreme light who became manifest on top of
the Himalaya mountain. Vyasa talks about the demon Taraka, who has
obtained a boon that he can be killed only by the son of Lord Shiva,
knowing fully well that Sati has immolated herself. Therefore, the
gods became scared and went to Himalayas and worshipped Her asking
to born and marry Lord Shiva. Shakti then appears before them and
grants them a boon that her manifestation will be born as Gauri as
the daughter of Himavan. Himalaya becomes choked with emotion when
he hears that She, whose belly contains millions of universes, is
about to become his daughter. He requests as follows, “Proclaim
to me your nature, and declare that yoga conjoined with bhakti and
that jnana in accord shruti whereby you and I become one.”

This sets the scene for Devi Gita and the teachings.

Brief summary:

In the Devi gita, following Himalayas request, the Devi proceeds to
describe her essential forms. The Devi declares that prior to
creation, She is the only existent entity, the one supreme Brahman
and is pure consciousness. Then She outlines the basic evolution of
the causal, subtle and gross bodies of the supreme Self when
enjoined with maya. The treatment here is very similar to that of
Vedantasara and Panchadasi, but in much more simpler terms than the
latter. Then She reveals Her forms (both the frightful and pleasing)
to the gods and Himalaya. Then follows a detailed summary of the
yoga, the stages of bhakti and the ways to attain Her.

Simplicity and Profoundness:

Devi gita is both simple and profound. It is different from other
gitas in the respect that statements are clear and can not be
reinterpreted according to one’s taste. For example, several
commentaries have been written on the Bhagavad Gita of Krishna,
wherein each commentator feels differently regarding bhakti and
jnana. For example, it required Madhusudana Saraswati to explain
krama mukti in clear terms (though Shankara mentions it also) of
bhakti. But Devi Gita is clear: “Even when a person performs
bhakti, knowledge need not arise. He will go to the Devi’s Island
(similar to Brahmaloka). Till the complete knowledge in the form of
my consciousness arises, there is no liberation.”

Similarly, the word of ‘coming’, ‘going’, ‘becoming’ cause confusion
since one can not become Brahman, if one is already one. The Devi
Gita provides a clear explanation that all these terms are
applicable only as long as one in maya. It is the clarity of these
terms and the simple explanation of complex vedantic and
philosophical questions that makes Devi Gita unique.

Start of chapter 33:

The Devi said: “O Giriraja ! This whole universe, moving and
unmoving is created by My maya shakti. This maya is conceived in Me.
It is not, in reality, different or separate from Me. So I am the
only Chit, Intelligence.

There is no other Intelligence other than Me. Viewed practically, it
is known variously as Maya, avidya; but viewed from the point of
Brahman, there is no such thing as Maya. Only one Brahman exists, I
am that Brahman, of the nature of Intelligence. I create this whole
world on this Unchangeable eternal Brahman and enter first as Prana
within it in the form of chidabhasa.

O Mountain ! Unless I enter as Breath, how can this birth and death
and leaving and retaking bodies after bodies be accounted for! As
one akasa is denominated variouslty as Ghatakas, patakas, so too I
appear variously by acknowledging this prana in various places due
to avidya and various antahkaranas.

As the sun rays are never defiled when they illumine various objects
on earth, so too, I am not defiled in entering thus into various
high and low antahkaranas. The ignorant people attach buddhi and
other things of activity on Me and say that the Atman is the doer.
The intelligent people do not say that. I remain as the Witness in
the hearts of all men, not as the Doer.”

SHRI DEVI GITA
Shri Giridhar Madras

1) Sri Mata
— Sacred Mother (feminine); the Seer, the Seen and the Seeing.
— The Knower; the Measurer (masculine)
— “For Whom all creatures are born.” Taittiriya Upanishad 3. 2

Sri Lalita Sahasranama, C. S. Murthy,
Ass. Advertisers and Printers, 1989.

“The Saktas worship the Universal Energy as Mother; it is the
sweetest name they know. The mother is the highest ideal of
womanhood in India. […]

Mother is the first manifestation of power and is considered a
higher idea than father. The name of mother brings the idea of
Shakti, Divine energy and omnipotence. The baby believes its mother
to be all-powerful, able to do anything. The Divine Mother is the
Kundalini sleeping in us; without worshipping Her, we can never know
ourselves. All merciful, all-powerful, omnipresent – these are
attributes of the Divine Mother. She is the sum total of the energy
in the Universe.

Every manifestation of power in the universe is Mother. She is Life,
She is Intelligence, She is Love. She is in the universe, yet
separate from it. She is a person, and can be seen and known – as
Sri Ramakrishna saw and knew Her. Established in the idea of Mother,
we can do anything. She quickly answers prayers.

She can show Herself to us in any form at any moment. The Divine
Mother can have form (rupa) and name (nama), or name without form;
and as we worship Her in these various aspects, we can rise to Pure
Being, having neither form nor name.

The sum-total of all the cells in an organism is one person. Each
soul is like one cell, and the sum of them is God. And beyond that
is the Absolute. The sea calm is the Absolute; the same sea in waves
is the Divine Mother. She is time, space and causation. Mother is
the same as Brahman and has two natures; the conditioned and the
unconditioned. As the former, She is God, nature and soul. As the
latter, she is unknown and unknowable. Out of the Unconditioned came
the trinity, God, nature and soul – the triangle of existence.

A bit of Mother, a drop, was Krishna; another was Buddha. The
worship of even one spark of Mother in our earthly mother leads to
greatness. Worship Her if you want love and wisdom.”

Swami Vivekananda, “Inspired Talks, My Master and Other Writings”,
Wed. July 2,1895, Ramakrishna- Vivekananda Center, NY, pp. 48-49.

“The Goddess is the great Sakti. She is Maya, for of her the maya
which produces the samsara is. As Lord of Maya she is Mahamaya.
Devi is avidya because she binds, and vidya because she liberates
and destroys the samsara. She is praktri and as existing before
creation is the Adya Sakti. Devi is the Vacaka Sakti, the
manifestation of Cit in Praktri, and the Vicya Sakti or Cit
itself. The Atma should be contemplated as Devi. Sakti or Devi is
thus the Brahman revealed in the mother aspect (Srimata) as creatrix
and nourisher of the worlds. Kali say of herself in Yogini
Tantra: “I am the bodily form of Saccidananda and I am the brahman
that has emanated from brahman.”

K. K. Klostermaier, Hinduism: A Short History,
Oneworld Pub., 2000, p. 211.

THE PRIMEVAL ENERGY

One of the unique features of Hinduism is the fact that it conceives
Divinity also as Mother Goddess. When Divinity has no name or form —
which is the most important declaration of the Upanishads, the next
logical step is to recognize that the Supreme has no specifity in
terms of gender. The Upanishads transcend the gender-specific
connotation and invent the unique Sanskrit word tat, meaning ‘that’
for that Supreme Reality. And therefore they argue, whatever reason
or rhyme we have in referring to God by a masculine pronoun, the
same right there is for us to call God by a feminine pronoun. The
energy of every Cosmic Divinity is taken to be feminine and thus
arises the interesting concept of primordial power or the
[[Parâshakti] ], which means ‘Power Supreme’.

BRAHMAN TO BE KNOWN, SHAKTI TO BE WORSHIPPED

The primordial Parâshakti is therefore the ultimate dynamic energy
of the transcendental Brahman, than which there is no other
existence. In fact it is technically wrong to say that She
(Parâshakti) is the Energy of Brahman, because the nature of
Brahman does not allow any attributes or predicates.The moment we
attribute anything to Brahman we have already delimited and
circumscribed it. When we talk of the Energy of the Ultimate Reality
we have already descended one step from the supreme pedestal of the
Unmanifested Attributeless Ultimate.

But the beauty of the concept of Parâshakti is that She is
transcendent beyond anything that is finite and immanent in
everything there is. So while we predicate it and relate it to other
things, it is still the Ultimate Supreme that can be talked about.
While Brahman has only to be cognized, Parâshakti can be
worshipped with a name and form. She is the Divine Will personified.
She is the Conscious Power beyond everything. She is the Presence,
invisible and constant, that sustains the world, linking form and
name, holding them in interdependence. There is nothing impossible
for Her. She is the Universal Goddess. She is all knowledge, all
strength, all triumph and all victory. She is the Goddess Supreme
(Maheshvari) who brings to us the total state of illumination.

Devi Mahatmyam

 

 

 

 
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